Alpinia vitellina var. cannifolia (Ridl.) I.M.Turner

Last updated: 02 April 2015

Scientific Name

Alpinia vitellina var. cannifolia (Ridl.) I.M.Turner

Synonyms

Alpinia cannifolia Ridl., Languas cannifolia (Ridl.) Burkill [1]

Vernacular Name

Malaysia Puar minyak, temu (Peninsula). [2][3]

Geographical Distributions

Alpinia vitellina can be found Malaysia. It is grown in dense secondary forest, and is rather rare. [2]

Botanical Description

A. vitellina comes from the family of Zingiberaceae. It is a stout herb with a size measuring up to 1.2-1.5 m tall. [2]

The leaves are lance-shaped to oblong in shape, measures up to 30 cm x 15 cm, narrowed base while the petiole is measures up to 2-5 cm long. The panicle is an erect, measuring 10-15 cm long, pubescent and with small bracteoles. [2]

The sepal is measures 2.5 mm long and pubescent while the petal tube is slender, with linear lobes, measuring 2.5 cm long, rounded and yellow. The labellum is measures 2-2.5 cm long, oblong, bifid, crisped margins and orange. The staminodes are short and red. The stamen is measures 2.5 cm long, with broadly winged filament, orange and pubescent. The 3-lobed anther is crested. [2]

The capsule is an oblong, pubescent and with 2-3-seeded.The measures 8 mm long black seed is an oblong. [2]

Cultivation

No documentation

Chemical Constituent

No documentation

Plant Part Used

No documentation

Traditional Use

No documentation

Preclinical Data

No documentation

Clinical Data

No documentation

Dosage

No documentation

Poisonous

No documentation

Line drawing

324

Figure 1: The line drawing of Alpinia vitellina var. cannifoli. [2]

References

  1. The Plant List. Ver 1.1. Alpinia vitellina var. cannifolia (Ridl.) I.M.Turner [homepage on the internet]. c2013. [updated 2012 March 26; cited 2015 April 02] Available from: http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-219108
  2. Ibrahim H. Alpinia vitellina (Lindley) Ridley var. cannaefolia (Ridley) I.M. Turner. In: van Valkenburg JLCH, Bunyapraphatsara N, editors. Plant Resources of South-East Asia No. 12(2): Medicinal and poisonous plants 2. Leiden, Netherlands: Backhuys Publisher; 2001. p. 60-61
  3. Umberto Q CRC World Dictionary of Medicinal and Poisonous Plants: Common Names, Scientific Names, Eponyms, Synonyms, and Etymology (5 Volume Set). Boca Raton, FL: CRC press L.L.C ; 2012. p. 206.