Buchanania arborescens (Blume) Blume

Last updated: 22 April 2015

Scientific Name

Buchanania arborescens (Blume) Blume

Synonyms

Buchanania angustifolia Benth. [Illegitimate], Buchanania arborescens F.Muell. [Illegitimate], Buchanania attopeuensis (Pierre) Tardieu, Buchanania bancana Miq., Buchanania decandra Blanco, Buchanania florida A.Gray [Illegitimate], Buchanania glaberrima Ridl., Buchanania intermedia Wight, Buchanania longifolia Span., Buchanania longifolia Blume, Buchanania lucida Blume, Buchanania monticola Kaneh. & Hatus., Buchanania muelleri Engl., Buchanania nabirensis Kaneh. & Hatus., Buchanania novohibernica Lauterb., Buchanania palembanica Blume, Buchanania papuana C.T.White, Buchanania petiolaris Miq., Buchanania platyphylla Merr., Buchanania polybotrya Miq., Buchanania pseudoflorida G.Perkins, Buchanania scandens Lauterb., Buchanania solomonensis Merr. & L.M.Perry, Buchanania subobovata Griff., Buchanania versteeghii Merr. & L.M.Perry, Coniogeton arborescens Blume [1]

Vernacular Name

Malaysia Otak udang tumpul (Peninsular); rengas laut (Sarawak); beluno-beluno (Sabah) [2]; kelumpang keras, otak hudang, katak hudang, rengan pasir [3], ketak hudang, katak udang, pauh pipit, terentang tikus [4]
English Sparrow's mango [2], satin wood, light wood [4]
Indonesia Popohan (General); getasan (Javanese); rawa-rawa pipit (Kalimantan) [2]
Thailand Chaa muang (Northern); luaet khwai, mamuang khee kratai (Peninsular) [2]
Brunei Kepala tundang, rengas ayam [2]
Philippines Balinghasai (General) [2]
Vietnam C[aa]y m[uw]ng ri [2]

Geographical Distributions

Buchanania arborescens is distributed from India and the Andaman Islands to Burma (Myanmar), Indo-China, southern China, Taiwan, Thailand, throughout the Malesian region towards the Solomon Islands and northern Australia. [2]

Botanical Description

B. arborescens comes from the family of Anacardiaceae. It is an evergreen tree, small to fairly large but rarely large and measures up to 35(-42) m tall. [2]

The bole is cylindrical, straight, branchless for up to 20 m, measures up to 100 cm in diametre, and sometimes with small buttresses up to 1(-4) m high. The surface of the bark is smooth or pock-marked, pale whitish to grey-brown or reddish-brown. The inner bark is fibrous, reddish-brown or pink, and exuding a clear, colourless or pink or greyish gum. The crown is compact. [2]

The leaves are arranged spirally, simple, entire, sessile or petiolate and exstipulate. The leaves are folded lengthwise where the first pair is opposite and the subsequent ones are arranged spirally. [2]

The flowers are in an axillary panicle, small, (4-)5(-6)-merous and whitish. The sepal is lobed, persistent or caducous. The stamens are twice the number of the petals while the anthers are usually arrowhead-shaped. The disk is shallowly cup-shaped while the margin is dentate. The ovary is superior, with 4-6 carpels, connate at the very base only with 1 ovule each, usually only with 1 fertile carpel, with short style, oblique stigma and truncate. [2]

The fruit is a 1-celled drupe with woody or bony stone. [2]

The seed is with free testa from the endocarp. Seedling is with epigeal germination. The cotyledons are emergent and fleshy while the hypocotyl is elongated. [2]

Cultivation

It is a fairly common lower-storey tree over sandy and rocky coasts, kerangas and river banks, but is also found in peat swamp forests and on limestone hills. [2]

Chemical Constituent

No documentation

Plant Part Used

No documentation

Traditional Use

No documentation

Preclinical Data

No documentation

Clinical Data

No documentation

Dosage

No documentation

Poisonous Management

No documentation

Line drawing

416

Figure 1: The line drawing of B. arborescens (Blume) Blume.[2]

References

  1. The Plant List. Ver1.1. Buchanania arborescens (Blume). [homepage on the Internet]. c2013 [updated 2012 Mar 23; cited 2015 Apr 22]. Available from: http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-2684757
  2. Buchanania arborescens (Blume) Blume. In: Sosef MSM, Hong LT, Prawirohatmodjo S, editors. Plant Resources of South-East Asia No. 5 (3): Timber trees: Lesser-known timbers. Leiden, Netherlands: Backhuys Publisher; 1998.
  3. Herbal Medicine Research Centre, Institute Medical Research. Compendium of Medicinal Plants Used in Malaysia. Volume 1. Kuala Lumpur: HMRC IMR; 2002. p. 123.
  4. Umberto Q. CRC World Dictionary of Medicinal and Poisonous Plants: Common Names, Scientific Names, Eponyms, Synonyms, and Etymology (5 Volume Set). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 1999. p. 376.