Cinchona officinalis L.

Last updated: 29 April 2015

Scientific Name

Cinchona officinalis L.

Synonyms

Cascarilla officinalis (L.) Ruiz, Cinchona academica Guibourt, Cinchona chahuarguera Pav., Cinchona coccinea Pav. ex DC., Cinchona colorata Lambert, Cinchona condaminea Bonpl., Cinchona crispa Tafalla ex Howard, Cinchona legitima Ruiz ex Lamb., Cinchona palton Pav., Cinchona peruviana Mutis, Cinchona suberosa Pav. ex Howard, Cinchona uritusinga Pav. ex Howard, Hindsia subandina Krause, Quinquina officinalis (L.) Kuntze, Quinquina palton (Pav.) Kuntze [1]

Vernacular Name

Malaysia Kuinin [2]
English Crown cinchona, ledger cinchona, yellow cinchona [2]

Geographical Distributions

Cinchona officinalis is naturally distributed in South America from Colombia to Bolivia and planted in many tropical countries such as India and Indone­sia (Java). This plant occurs naturally in mountainous regions at 1200-3000 m altitude. [2]

Botanical Description

C. officinalis falls under the family of Rubiaceae. It is a small tree that can reach up to 16 m tall. [2]

The leaves measure 7-28 cm x 2.5-13 cm, hairless and with domatia beneath. [2]

The flowers are 8-17 mm long, with hairless sepal and with yellowish-white to fleshy-colored or red petal. [2]

The fruit is up to 25 mm long, smooth or sparsely hairy. [2]

Cultivation

In Java, it is planted at 800-2000 m. [2]

Chemical Constituent

No documentation

Plant Part Used

No documentation

Traditional Use

No documentation

Preclinical Data

No documentation

Clinical Data

No documentation

Dosage

No documentation

Poisonous Management

No documentation

Line drawing

471

Figure 1: The line drawing of C. officinalis L. [2]

References

  1. The Plant List. Ver1.1. Cinchona officinalis L.[homepage on the Internet]. c2013 [updated 2012 Apr 18; cited 2015 Apr 28]. Available from: http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/tro-27900157
  2. Staritsky G, Huffnagel E, Dharmadi A, Dalimoenthe SL. Cinchona officinalis L. In: de Padua LS, Bunyapraphatsara N, Lemmens RHMJ, editors. Plant Resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1. Leiden, Netherlands: Backhuys Publisher, 1999; p.204.