Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt

Last updated: 06 May 2015

Scientific Name

Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt

Synonyms

Bryonia acerifolia D.Dietr., Bryonia alceifolia Willd., Bryonia barbata Buch.-Ham. ex Cogn., Bryonia grandis L., Bryonia sinuosa Wall. [Invalid], Cephalandra grandis Kurz, Cephalandra indica (Wight & Arn.) Naudin [Illegitimate], Cephalandra moghadd (Asch.) Broun & Massey, Cephalandra schimperi Naudin, Coccinia helenae Buscal. & Muschl., Coccinia indica Wight & Arn. [Illegitimate], Coccinia loureiriana M.Roem., Coccinia moghadd (J.F.Gmel.) Asch., Coccinia moimoi M.Roem., Coccinia palmatisecta Kotschy, Coccinia schimperi Naudin, Coccinia wightiana M.Roem., Cucumis pavel Kostel., Cucurbita dioica Roxb. ex Wight & Arn., Momordica bicolor Blume [1]

Vernacular Name

Malaysia Pepasan, papas an [2]
English Ivy gourd, small gourd, scarlet gourd [2]
Indonesia Papasan, kemaron­gan (Java); bolu teke (Java) [2]
Thailand Phaktamlung (General); phakkhaep (Northern) [2]
Laos Tam ling, tam nin [2]
Cambodia Slök baahs [2]
Vietnam Hoa b[as]t, rau b[as]t [2]

Geographical Distributions

Coccinia grandis is distributed from Africa to the Indo-Malaysian region. This plant occurs wild in grasslands, brushwoods, on roadsides, in hedges and light forests from the plains up to 1500 m altitude. [2]

Botanical Description

C. grandis comes from the family of Cucurbitaceae. It is a perennial, dioecious, climbing or trailing herb that can reach up to 20 m long with tuberous roots. [2]

The stem is green and longitudinally ribbed when young. It becomes white-spotted when older and eventually woody and slightly cylindrical. The tendrils are simple, usually one per node and in stipular position. [2]

The leaves are simple, arranged alternate and with petiole 1-5 cm long. The leaf blade is broadly ovate to subpentagonal or orbicular in outline, measuring 3-12 cm x 3-15 cm, shallowly to deeply palmately 3-5-lobed, cordate at base, with en­tire or sinuate margin and often with distinct reddish glandular teeth, hairless and dotted. [2]

The male flowers are axillary, solitary or paired and rarely 3-4 in a short raceme. The pedicel is 0.7-7 cm long. The receptacle is 3-7 mm long and tubular. There are 5 sepals, which are linear and measure up to 6 mm long. The petal is bell-shaped, yellow-orange, green veined and 5-lobed, where the lobes measure up to 2 cm x 1.5 cm. The staminal col­umn is 6 mm long. The female flowers are axillary and solitary. The pedicel is up to 2.5 cm long. The ovary is cylindrical, measures up to 1.5 cm long, with style 3 mm long, with 3-lobed stigma and each lobe is 2-lobed. [2]

The fruit is berry-like, ellipsoid or rarely spherical, measuring 3-7 cm x 1-3.5 cm, fleshy, green with white stripes when young and turns red at maturi­ty. The fruit stalk is up to 4 cm long. [2]

The seed is asymmetrical­ly pear-shaped in outline, compressed, measuring 6 mm x 3 mm x 1.5 mm, rather thick and with grooved margin and fibrillose testa. [2]

Cultivation

C. grandis cultivat­ed mainly in India, Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia. It seems to require well-distributed rain­fall and fairly high humidity. Soils should be well-drained as it is intolerant to waterlogging. [2]

Chemical Constituent

No documentation

Plant Part Used

No documentation

Traditional Use

No documentation

Preclinical Data

No documentation

Clinical Data

No documentation

Dosage

No documentation

Poisonous Management

No documentation

Line drawing

497

Figure 1: The line drawing of C. grandis (L.) Voigt [2]

References

  1. The Plant List. Ver1.1. Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt[homepage on the Internet]. c2013 [updated 2012 Mar 23; cited 2015 May 05]. Available from: http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-2729083
  2. Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt In: Siemonsma JS, Piluek K, editors. Plant Resources of South-East Asia No 8. Vegetables. Wageningen, Netherlands: Pudoc Scientific Publishers; 1993.