Pothos scandens L.

Last updated: 3 August 2015

Scientific Name

Pothos scandens L.

Synonyms

Batis hermaphrodita Blanco, Podospadix angustifolia Raf., Pothos angustifolius Reinw. ex Miq. [Illegitimate], Pothos angustifolius (Raf.) C.Presl, Pothos chapelieri Schott, Pothos cognatus Schott, Pothos decipiens Schott, Pothos exiguiflorus Schott, Pothos fallax Schott, Pothos hermaphroditus (Blanco) Merr., Pothos horsfieldii Miq., Pothos leptospadix de Vriese, Pothos longifolius C.Presl, Pothos microphyllus C.Presl, Pothos scandens f. angustior Engl., Pothos scandens var. cognatus (Schott) Engl., Pothos scandens var. helferianus Engl., Pothos scandens var. sumatranus de Vriese, Pothos scandens var. zeylanicus de Vriese, Pothos longifolius C.Presl, Pothos microphyllus C.Presl, Pothos scandens f. angustior Engl., Pothos scandens var. cognatus (Schott) Engl., Pothos scandens var. helferianus Engl., Pothos scandens var. sumatranus de Vriese, Pothos scandens var. zeylanicus de Vriese, Pothos scandens var. zollingerianus (Schott) Engl., Pothos zollingeri Engl. [Spelling variant], Pothos zollingeri Schott, Pothos zollingerianus Schott, Tapanava indica Raf., Tapanava rheedei Hassk. [1]

Vernacular Name

Malaysia Seginting, juloh-juloh (Peninsular) [2][3]
China Tang lang die da [3]
India Adhika beeluballi, agachoppu, anaparua, bendarli, gechoppu, harsoo, kurobitho, lowsik-lomic, murugina beelu, tomap [3]
Indonesia Klabangan (Javanese); tapanawa kecil (Ambon) [2]
Thailand Cha khep (Central); waai tamoi (Uttaradit); kho kiu (Surat Thani, Yala) [2], kaw kin bai noi, kaw kin boi-lek, t’kap, wai so toi, wai-ta-moi [3]
Laos Cha-kep, ma nok hon [2][3]
Myanmar Wai mai (Shan) [2][3]
Philippines Apis (Tagalog); hipan, oro-ola (Bikol) [2]
Vietnam R[as]y leo [2].

Geographical Distributions

Pothos scandens has an extremely large area of distribution such as Madagascar, the Comores, the Seychelles, Nepal, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Burma (Myanmar), Indochina, Southern China (Yunnan), Thailand, and the whole Malaysian region except New Guinea. [2]

P. scandens grows on trees and rocks in primary and secondary, wet to dry forests in the lowland and mountains up to 2100 m altitude. Sometimes it is found in hedges, scrub vegetation and plantations, or on sea cliffs. [2]

Botanical Description

P. scandens is comes from the family Araceae. It is a root-climbing liana measures up to 6 m long. The stem is weakly angled or terete, up to 1 cm in diametre. [2]

The leaves are arranged distichously alternate, simple and entire, ovate to elliptical or lance-shaped, 3-14 cm x 2-10 cm, rounded to wedge-shaped at base, attenuate-mucronate at apex, entire, with 2 intramarginal veins per side and numerous parallel small veins. The petiole is 2-14 cm long, broadly winged, truncate and rounded or having auricles at apex. Stipules are absent. [2]

The inflorescence is a solitary spadix in leaf axil and with spathe at base. The spherical to ovoid spadix is with stipe sharply bent at anthesis, 4-10 mm in diametre and yellowish-green to dirty white while the 4-8 mm long spathe is ovate. Margins are variously inrolled and greenish to maroon. Flowers are bisexual, 1-2 mm in diametre, with 6 tepals and 6 stamens. The 3-celled ovary is superior, with sessile stigma and punctiform. [2]

The fruit is 1-1.5 cm long berry, 1-5 per ripened inflorescence, ripening to deep scarlet and 1-3-seeded. [2]

The seeds are ellipsoid to compressed-spherical, 3-6 mm in diameter, with smooth testa and lacking albumen. [2]

Cultivation

No documentation

Chemical Constituent

No documentation

Plant Part Used

No documentation

Traditional Use

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Preclinical Data

No documentation

Clinical Data

No documentation

Dosage

No documentation

Poisonous Management

No documentation

Line drawing

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Figure 1: The line drawing of P. scandens [2]

References

  1. The Plant List. Ver 1.1. Pothos scandens L. [homepage on the Internet]. c2013. [updated on 2012 Mar 23; cited 2015 Jul 31]. Available from: http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-163823
  2. Pothos scandens L. In: Lemmens RHMJ, Bunyapraphatsara N, editors. Plant Resources of South-East Asia No.12 (3): Medicinal and poisonous plants 3. Leiden, Netherlands: Backhuys Publishers; 2003
  3. Quattrocchi U. CRC world dictionary of medicinal and poisonous plants: Common names, scientific names, eponyms, synonyms, and etymology. Volume IV M-Q. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press; 2012. p. 707-708.