Sterculia foetida L.

Last updated: 27 Aug 2015

Scientific Name

Sterculia foetida L.

Synonyms

Clompanus foetida (L.) Kuntze, Sterculia mexicana var. guianensis Sagot [1]

Vernacular Name

Malaysia Kelumpang, kelumpang jari, kelapong, kayu lepong [2], kelupang [3]
English Great sterculia, hazel sterculia, horse almond, indian almond, java olive [3]
China Xiang ping po [3][4]
India Badam, jangal badam [3], jangli badam [4]
Indonesia Jangkang, kepuh,kepoh, poh (Javanese); kepoh, koleangka (Sundanese) [2]
Thailand Sam, sam rang, chamahong [2]
Philippines Kalumpang [3]
Vietnam Trom hoi [3]
Sri Lanka Kadutenga, kaduteynga, pinari, telambu, telembu [3]
Nepal Kaju.[4]
France Arbre puant.[4]
Spain Anacagüita [4].

Geographical Distributions

Sterculia foetida is distributed from Eastern Africa, India, Sri Lanka, Burma (Myanmar), Indo-China, Thailand, throughout the Malesian region (but not reported for Sarawak and Papua New Guinea), Northern Australia and Hawaii. [5]

S. foetida occurs in primary and secondary forest, often on river banks and on coral sandstone rocks along the coast, up to 1000 m altitude. The heartwood is pinkish and has a pungent smell. The density is 495-600(-760) kg/m3 at 15% moisture content. [5]

Botanical Description

S. foetida is a member of the family Sterculiaceae. It is a medium-sized to fairly large deciduous tree, which is measure up to 40 m tall with its bole is measure about 90(-120) cm in diametre. The buttresses are up to measure 1.5 m high, sparsely cracked bark surface and peel off into large pieces or slightly fissured and dippled, lenticellate and whitish-grey to greyish-brown in colour. The inner bark is fibrous, brown or reddish-brown in colour and stout twigs which are measure about 25 mm in diametre. [5]

The leaves are palmately compound with (5-)6-10 leaflets, with a size of measure 10-25(-45) cm long petiole, caduceus stipules, elliptical to lanceolate in shape of leaflets, with a size measure about (7-)12-15(-20) cm x (3-)4-6(-7) cm, acute at the base and glabrescent. [5]

The inflorescence is an axillary or subterminal and paniculate. The sepal is with obconical tube that is hairy inside and 5 lance-shaped spreading lobes, which are much longer than the tube. The male flowers are with 14-15 anthers. The follicles are usually 5, suborbicular or boat-shaped, measure 8-14 cm long and red in colour. [5]

The seed is measures 2-3 cm long, ellipsoid and black in colour. [5]

Cultivation

No documentation.

Chemical Constituent

No documentation.

Plant Part Used

No documentation.

Traditional Use

No documentation.

Preclinical Data

No documentation.

Clinical Data

No documentation.

Dosage

No documentation.

Poisonous Management

No documentation.

Line drawing

1009

Figure 1: The line drawing of S. foetida [5]

References

  1. The Plant List.  Ver1.1. Sterculia foetida L.[homepage on the Internet]. c2013 [updated 2012 Mar 23; cited 2015 Aug 18]. Available from: http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-2579743
  2. Herbal Medicine Research Centre. Compendium of Medicinal Plants Used in Malaysia. Volume 1. Kuala Lumpur: HMRC-IMR: 2002. p.361.
  3. Quattrocchi U. CRC world dictionary of medicinal and poisonous plants: Common names, scientific names, eponyms, synonyms, and etymology. Volume IV M-Q. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press; 2012. p. 405.
  4. Philippine Medicinal Plants. Kalumpang. Sterculia foetida L. [homepage on the Internet]. no date [updated 2013 Oct; cited 2015 August 27] Available from: http://www.stuartxchange.com/Kalumpang.html
  5. Sterculia foetida L. In: Lemmens RHMJ, Soerianegara I, Wong WC, editors. Plant Resources of South-East Asia No.5(2): Timber trees: Minor Commercial Timbers. Leiden, Netherlands: Backhuys Publishers; 1995.