Uncaria callophylla Blume ex Korth.

Last updated: 1 September 2015

Scientific Name

Uncaria callophylla Blume ex Korth.

Synonyms

Uncaria avenia Valeton, Uncaria jasminiflora Wall. ex Hook.f., Uncaria jasminiflora var. macrophylla King & Gamble, Uncaria luzoniensis Merr., Uncaria wrayi King, Uruparia callophylla (Blume ex Korth.) Kuntze, Uruparia jasminiflora (Wall. ex Hook.f.) Kuntze. [1]

Vernacular Name

Malaysia Akar kelawit, akar kelait (Borneo) [2]
English Hook vine [2].

Geographical Distributions

Uncaria callophylla is found in Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, and Borneo. [3]

U. callophylla can be cultivated in areas with high rainfall throughout the year. Usually it grows well at altitudes of 0-200 m but cultivation up to 1000 m is possible. [3]

Botanical Description

U. callophylla is a member of the family Rubiaceae. It is a woody forest climber with slender 4-angled branches, differing from Uncaria gambir especially in the leathery leaves, which domatia hairy is lacking, and smaller heads. The product is inferior to 'true' gambier. [3]

Cultivation

No documentation.

Chemical Constituent

No documentation.

Plant Part Used

No documentation.

Traditional Use

No documentation.

Preclinical Data

No documentation.

Clinical Data

No documentation.

Dosage

No documentation.

Poisonous Management

No documentation.

Line drawing

1059

Figure 1: The line drawing of U. callophylla [3]

References

  1. The Plant List. Ver 1.1. Uncaria callophylla Blume ex Korth. [homepage on the Internet]. c2003. [updated on 2012 Mar 23; 2015 Sep 4]. Available from: http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-209764
  2. Quattrocchi U. CRC world dictionary of medicinal and poisonous plants: Common names, scientific names, eponyms, synonyms and etymology; Volume V R-Z. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press; 2012. Pp 670-671
  3. Jukema J, Wulijarni-Soetjipto N, Lemmens RHMJ, Hildebrand JW. Uncaria callophylla Blume ex Korth. In: Lemmens RHMJ, Wulijarni-Soetjipto N, editors. Plant Resources of South-East Asia No. 3: Dye and tannin-producing plants. Wageningen, The Netherlands: Pudoc, 1991; p. 140.